El Hórreo – My Spanish Word Of The Day 1/4/2017

horrero
A Galician hórreo. Photo by Das Nili.

¡Hola!

My Spanish word of the day is:

el hórreo

raised grainary

A hórreo is a typical grainary of the northwest Iberian Peninsula.  It is built of wood or stone and is raised from the ground by pillars.  I learned about los hórreos while reading Mi punto de partida, a Spanish travel blog.  Los 10 pueblos costeros más bonitos de España is a slide show of beautiful little coastal villages.  One such village is Combarro, 6 kilometers away from the town of Pontevedra in Galicia, Spain.

Although the blog post at Mi punto de partida describes how the little town of Combarro contains, and is surrounded by, numerous hórreos, the photo accompanying the description is of the beach.  But, you can see some beautiful photos of actual hórreos at A Texan In Spain by Trevor Huxham.  The 12/12/2014 post is called Photo Post: Hórreos, or Galician Countryside Corncribs.  You can also read about the village of Combarro in Mr Huxham’s blog which is entitled Combarro, Spain: Galicia’s Most Beautiful Village?

¡Feliz Miércoles!

Photo Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%B3rreo#/media/File:Horrero.JPG

 

Maniobra de Heimlich – My Spanish Word of the Day 8/13/2015

La Maniobra de Heimlich

I just finished reading a cute blog post at Picnic at the Cathedral.  It is a blog for those who love to travel but are on a modest budget.  It is written by a married couple who call themselves Wife and Husband of Bath.  The post is entitled San Martín Church In Frómista: Romanesque Pilgramage Perfection And A Figurine Of A  One-Armed Hobo.   Now, what does all this have to do with Maniobra de Heimlich, Heimlich Maneuver, which is my Spanish word of the day?  Well, let me explain.

In this article, the Wife of Bath has posted several photos of the San Martin Cathedral in Frómista, Spain.  It is a Romanesque church built in the 1060’s.  She gives short descriptions of each photo and most of them concentrate on the architecture inside.  The last 3 photos of the post show capital carvings at the tops of several pillars.  Medieval figures are carved into what seems like action scenes.  But it is difficult for the modern viewer to understand what is happening in each scene.  Wife of Bath gives her own hilarious interpretations.  My favorite is the very last photo.  It shows 2 figures with their arms around the abdomen of a third.  Wife of Bath calls it Group Heimlich Maneuver?

Group Heimlich Maneuver? Photo of the inside the San Martín Cathedral in Frómista, Spain from the blog Picnic At The Cathedral.

After reading this blog post, I became interested in how to say Heimlich Maneuver in Spanish.  It is Maniobra de Heimlich.  Here is a definition from Wikipedia:  “La Maniobra de Heimlich, llamada Compresion abdominal, es un procedimiento de primeros auxilios para desobstruir el conducto respiratorio, normalmente bloqueado por un trozo de alimento o cualquier otro objeto”.

Wife of Bath’s blog post also includes a photo of a figurine of a one-armed hobo.  She found it in the hostel where she slept in Frómista.  In Spanish, the word for one-armed man is manco and the word for hobo is vagabundo.

Wife of Bath found this figurine of a one-armed hobo in her hostel room in Frómista.

El manco de la photo es vagabundo.

I certainly did enjoy discovering my Spanish word of the day.  To read the entire blog post by Wife of Bath, click here.  I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.